AUSTRALASIAN CONFERENCE ON

ARTIFICIAL LIFE AND COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE (ACALCI 2016)

2-5 February 2016

Canberra, Australia

springer
LNAI

Jun Wang

Jun Wang Biography: Jun Wang is a Chair Professor Computational Intelligence in the Department of Computer Science at City University of Hong Kong. Prior to this position, he held various academic positions at Dalian University of Technology, Case Western Reserve University, University of North Dakota, and Chinese University of Hong Kong. He also held various short-term visiting positions at USAF Armstrong Laboratory (1995), RIKEN Brain Science Institute (2001), Huazhong University of Science and Technology (2006–2007), and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2008-2011) as a Changjiang Chair Professor. Since 2011, he is a National Thousand-Talent Chair Professor at Dalian University of Technology on a part-time basis. He received a B.S. degree in electrical engineering and an M.S. degree in systems engineering from Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, China. He received his Ph.D. degree in systems engineering from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. His current research interests include neural networks and their applications. He published over 170 journal papers, 15 book chapters, 11 edited books, and numerous conference papers in these areas. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics since 2014 and a member of the editorial board of Neural Networks since 2012. He also served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks (1999-2009), IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics and its predecessor (2003-2013), and IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics – Part C (2002–2005), as a member of the editorial advisory board of International Journal of Neural Systems (2006-2013), as a guest editor of special issues of European Journal of Operational Research (1996), International Journal of Neural Systems (2007), Neurocomputing (2008, 2014), and International Journal of Fuzzy Systems (2010, 2011). He was an organizer of several international conferences such as the General Chair of the 13th International Conference on Neural Information Processing (2006) and the 2008 IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence, and a Program Chair of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (2012). He has been an IEEE Computational Intelligence Society Distinguished Lecturer (2010-2012, 2014-2016). In addition, he served as President of Asia Pacific Neural Network Assembly (APNNA) in 2006 and many organizations such as IEEE Fellow Committee (2011-2012); IEEE Computational Intelligence Society Awards Committee (2008, 2012, 2014), IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society Board of Directors (2013-2015), He is an IEEE Fellow, IAPR Fellow, and a recipient of an IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks Outstanding Paper Award and APNNA Outstanding Achievement Award in 2011, Natural Science Awards from Shanghai Municipal Government (2009) and Ministry of Education of China (2011), and Neural Networks Pioneer Award from IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (2014), among others.

Title: Collective Neurodynamic Optimization: A New Paradigm for Global and Distributed Optimization

Abstract:The past three decades witnessed the birth and growth of neurodynamic optimization which has emerged and matured as a powerful approach to real-time optimization due to its inherent nature of parallel and distributed information processing and the hardware realizability. Despite the success, almost all existing neurodynamic approaches work well only for convex and generalized-convex optimization problems with unimodal objective functions. Effective neurodynamic approach to constrained global optimization with multimodal objective functions is rarely available. In the meantime, population-based evolutionary and similar nature-inspired approaches emerged as prevailing methods for global optimization with many success stories in benchmark studies. Nevertheless, the heuristic and stochastic natures of their algorithms may limit their theoretical underpinnings. Both neurodynamic and evolutionary optimization approaches have their merits and limitations. For example, neurodynamic approaches are good at constrained and precise local search with proven convergence, but prone to trapping at local minima; whereas evolutionary-like approaches are good at global search, but weak at constraint handling and guaranteed optimality. Given the pros and cons of the two types of computationally intelligent optimization methods, it is natural to integrate them into ones toward hybrid intelligence. In this talk, starting with the idea and motivation of neurodynamic optimization, I will review the historic review and present the state of the art of neurodynamic optimization with many models for convex and generalized convex optimization. In particular, I will present a new population-based neurodynamic approach to constrained global optimization in the presence of nonconvexity. By deploying a population of individual neurodynamic models at a lower level coordinated by using some information exchange rules (such as PSO) at a upper level, it will be shown that many constrained global optimization problems could be solved effectively and efficiently. In addition to global optimization, collective neurodynamic optimization based on a population of neurodynamic models will be also discussed.